You are here

Clinical Psychological Science

Clinical Psychological Science

An official journal of the Association for Psychological Science
Other Titles in:
Psychology (General)

eISSN: 21677034 | ISSN: 21677026 | Current volume: 10 | Current issue: 5 Frequency: Bi-monthly
A Journal for a New Era

A confluence of recent developments has made clinical psychological science increasingly central to all areas of psychological science, including:
  1. translational research, which recognizes that mental illness is grounded in disruption of basic psychological processes (e.g., cognition, emotion, socialization, personality, perception, learning, motivation, development)
  2. transdiagnostic approaches, which focus on disrupted processes that are common to different forms of psychopathology (e.g., sleep, emotion regulation and expression, attachment)
  3. empirically supported assessment, diagnosis, and treatment
  4. molecular and behavioral genetics and proteomics, which link common and uncommon variations in genes with behaviors relevant to psychopathology and well-being
  5. neuroimaging, which enables characterization of the integrity of neural networks and patterns of brain activation associated with normal and abnormal functioning and suggests new avenues for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects
  6. new treatments focusing on brain and behavior change (e.g., transmagnetic stimulation, direct neural stimulation, new drug and/or behavioral treatment delivery systems, gene-targeted therapies)
All of the above developments are rapidly changing the treatment of mental illness. The Association for Psychological Science’s journal, Clinical Psychological Science, emerges from this confluence to provide readers with the best, most innovative research in clinical psychological science, giving researchers of all stripes a home for their work and a place in which to communicate with a broad audience of both clinical and other scientists.

Clinical Psychological Science provides metrics that help provide a view of the journal’s performance. The Association for Psychological Science is a signatory of DORA, which recommends that journal-based metrics not be used to assess individual scientist contributions, including for hiring, promotion, or funding decisions. Therefore, Clinical Psychological Science recommends that these metrics be used solely for those wishing to assess this journal:

  • Mean review time: 45 days to first decision (learn more)
  • Mean production time: 43 days to online publication
  • 2018 average monthly full-text downloads: 16,776
  • H index 34 (learn more)
  • SJR indicator (2018) 2.465 (learn more)

The journals of the Association for Psychological Science are sold as a package.
View the details of the subscription package.

The Association for Psychological Science (APS) is the leading international organization dedicated to advancing scientific psychology across disciplinary and geographic borders. APS members provide a richer understanding of the world through their research, teaching, and application of psychological science. APS is passionate about supporting psychological scientists in these pursuits, which it does by sharing cutting-edge research across all areas of the field through its journals and conventions; promoting the integration of scientific perspectives within psychological science and with related disciplines; fostering global connections among its members; engaging the public with research to promote broader understanding and awareness of psychological science; and advocating for increased support for psychological science in the public policy arena. More than 30,000 leading psychological researchers, as well as students and teachers, have made APS their scientific home. www.psychologicalscience.org

This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

Clinical Psychological Science publishes advances in clinical science and provides a venue for cutting-edge research across a wide range of conceptual views, approaches, and topics. The Journal encompasses many core domains that have defined clinical psychology, but also boundary-crossing advances that integrate and make contact with diverse disciplines and that may not easily be found in traditional clinical psychology journals. Among the key topics are research on the underlying mechanisms and etiologies of psychological health and dysfunction; basic and applied work on the diagnosis, assessment, treatment, and prevention of mental illness; service delivery; and promotion of well-being.

This broadly based international Journal sits at the interface of clinical psychological science and other disciplines, publishing the best papers from the full spectrum of relevant science. The Journal welcomes empirical papers as well as occasional reviews and associated theoretical formulations addressing the following:

  • Research from all areas of psychology and from all disciplines (e.g., genetics, neuroscience, psychiatry, public health, sociology) insofar as they relate to clinical psychology issues broadly conceived;
  • Basic research on the psychological and related processes that are disrupted in psychopathology;
  • Research on core areas of cognition, emotion, learning, memory, sensation, perception, and neuroscience that clearly addresses clinical phenomena;
  • Research related to clinical issues at all levels of analysis (from genes and molecules to contexts and cultures), using the full range of behavioral and biological methods, and incorporating both human and non-human animal models;
  • Research on specific clinical symptoms, syndromes, and diagnostic systems;
  • Studies with clinical patient populations as well as studies using non-clinical or pre-clinical populations that are relevant to understanding clinical dysfunction;
  • Basic and applied research relevant to clinical diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment;
  • Research focusing on precursors and risk factors for dysfunction as well as protective factors and resources that promote resilience and adaptive functioning;
  • Cultural and ethnic studies that advance our understanding of processes that relate to development of mental health or dysfunction; and
  •  Sophisticated, cross-cutting, and novel methodological, statistical, and mathematical approaches that enable advances in research.

These examples and all such approaches are critical components of the Journal. However, the very nature of what is meant by cutting-edge and the rapid advances in methods of assessment mean that its scope cannot be fully enumerated. The key criterion is that the research directly inform some facet of clinical psychology.

Editor
Jennifer L. Tackett Northwestern University, Department of Psychology, USA
Associate Editors
Pim Cuipjers VU Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Psychology, The Netherlands
Kelsie T. Forbush University of Kansas, Department of Psychology, USA
Vina Goghari University of Toronto, Department of Psychology, Canada
DeMond M. Grant Oklahoma State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jennifer Lau King's College London, Department of Psychology, UK
Steve S. Lee University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology, USA
Aidan G. C. Wright University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, USA
Tamika C. Zapolski Indiana University, Department of Psychology, USA
Open Science Advisors
Andrea Howard Carleton University, Canada
Tess Neal Arizona State University, New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, USA
Peer Review Manager
Becca G. White Association for Psychological Science
Consulting Editors
Theodore Beauchaine University of Notre Dame, Department of Psychology, USA
Silke Behrendt University of Southern Denmark, Department of Psychology, Denmark
Brittany Bohrer University of California, San Diego, Health Eating Disorders Center for Treatment and Research, USA
Avshalom Caspi Duke University, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, USA
Christian Chan The University of Hong Kong, Department of Psychology, People’s Republic of China
Alex S. Cohen Louisiana State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Karin Coifman Kent State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jonathan S. Comer Florida International University, Department of Psychology, USA
Ioana Cristea University of Pavia, Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, Italy
Andres De Los Reyes University of Maryland, Department of Psychology, USA
David D. Ebert VU Amsterdam, Department of Psychology, The Netherlands
Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Sports and Sports Science, Germany
Eiko Fried Leiden University, Clinical Psychology Department, Netherlands
Delia Fuhrmann King’s College London, Department of Psychology, UK
Chardée A. Galán University of Southern California Dornsife, Department of Psychology, USA
Dylan G. Gee Yale University, Department of Psychology, USA
Laura T. Germine McLean Hospital, Institute for Technology in Psychiatry, and Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, USA
Brandon E. Gibb Binghamton University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jeffrey M. Girard The University of Kansas, Department of Psychology, USA
Joseph P. Gone Harvard University, Department of Anthropology, and Harvard Medical School, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, USA
Lauren Hallion University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychology, USA
Michael Hallquist University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, USA
Nick Haslam University of Melbourne, School of Psychological Sciences, Australia
Emily Holmes Uppsala University, Department of Psychology, Sweden
Jonathan D. Huppert The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Psychology, Israel
Luke W. Hyde University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, USA
Ross Jacobucci University of Notre Dame, Department of Psychology, USA
Sheri L. Johnson University of California, Berkeley, Department of Psychology, USA
Matt Judah University of Arkansas, Department of Psychological Science, USA
Aleksandra Kaurin Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department of Psychology, Germany
Kevin M. King University of Washington, Department of Psychology, USA
Evan M. Kleiman Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Psychology, USA
Autumn Kujawa Vanderbilt University, Department of Psychology and Human Development, USA
Junghee Lee The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology, USA
Joelle LeMoult The University of British Columbia, Department of Psychology, Canada
Cheri A. Levinson University of Louisville, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, USA
Andrew Littlefield Texas Tech University, Department of Psychological Sciences, USA
Richard Liu Harvard Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, USA
Lorenzo Lorenzo-Luaces Indiana University Bloomington, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, USA
Priscilla Lui Southern Methodist University, Department of Psychology, USA
Wolfgang Lutz University of Trier, Department of Psychology, Germany
David K. Marcus Washington State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Kristian E. Markon University of Iowa, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, USA
Michelle M. Martel University of Kentucky, Department of Psychology, USA
Brian P. Marx U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, National Center for PTSD, USA
Juliette McClendon National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, and Boston University School of Medicine, USA
Isha W. Metzger University of Georgia, Department of Psychology, USA
Marcel Miché University of Basel, Department of Psychology, Switzerland
Meghan Miller University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and MIND Institute, USA
Antonio A. Morgan-López RTI International, North Carolina, USA
Kristin Naragon-Gainey The University of Western Australia, School of Psychological Science, Australia
Roisin M. O’Connor Concordia University Montreal, Department of Psychology, USA
Thomas M. Olino Temple University, Department of Psychology, USA
Henry Otgaar Maastricht University, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, and KU Leuven, Faculty of Law, The Netherlands
Vikram Patel Harvard Medical School, Department of Global Health and Population, USA
Sarah Pedersen University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychiatry and Department of Psychology, USA
Koraly Pérez-Edgar Pennsylvania State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Victoria Pile King's College London, Department of Psychology, UK
Daniel S. Pine National Institute of Mental Health, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience, USA
Belinda Platt Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Germany
Andrew Przybylski University of Oxford, Oxford Internet Institute, UK
Soledad Quero Jaume I University, Department of Basic and Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Spain
Kathleen Reardon Center for Applied Psychological and Family Studies, The Family Institute at Northwestern University, USA
Soo Rhee University of Colorado Boulder, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, USA
Leah Richmond-Rakerd University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, USA
Craig Rodriguez-Seijas University of Michigan, Department of Psychology, USA
David Rosenfield Southern Methodist University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jessica Salvatore Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Psychology, USA
Jessica L. Schleider Stony Brook University, Department of Psychology, USA
Edward A. Selby Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Psychology
Tomer Shechner University of Haifa, Department of Psychology, Israel
Jasper A. Smits University of Texas at Austin, Department of Psychology, USA
José A. Soto The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Sarah H. Sperry Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, USA
Kasey Stanton Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Psychology, USA
Gregory P. Strauss University of Georgia, Department of Psychology, USA
Charles T. Taylor University of California San Diego, Department of Psychiatry, USA
Bethany A. Teachman University of Virginia, Department of Psychology, USA
Timothy Trull University of Missouri, Department of Psychological Sciences, USA
Laura M. Tully University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, USA
Sarah E. Victor Texas Tech University, Department of Psychological Sciences, USA
David Watson University of Notre Dame, Department of Psychology, USA
Ashley Watts University of Missouri, USA
Jennifer Wildes University of Chicago, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, USA
Michael W. Williams University of Houston, Department of Psychology, USA
Sylia Wilson University of Minnesota, Institute of Child Development, USA
Marcella L. Woud Ruhr-University Bochum, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Germany
Lira Yoon University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Department of Psychology
Peter Zachar Auburn University at Montgomery, Department of Psychology, USA
Johannes Zimmermann University of Kassel, Germany
  • Clarivate Analytics: Current Contents - Social & Behavioral Sciences
  • Clarivate Analytics: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE)
  • Clarivate Analytics: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI)
  • ProQuest
  • PsycINFO
  • For submission guidelines, please visit the APS site:

    http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/journals/clinical/2016-clinical-submission-guidelines

    Read the latest editorial policies from the APS Publications Committee.

    Orcid

    As part of our commitment to ensuring an ethical, transparent and fair peer review process SAGE is a supporting member of ORCID, the Open Researcher and Contributor ID. ORCID provides a unique and persistent digital identifier that distinguishes researchers from every other researcher, even those who share the same name, and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submission, supports automated linkages between researchers and their professional activities, ensuring that their work is recognized.

    The collection of ORCID iDs from corresponding authors is now part of the submission process of this journal. If you already have an ORCID iD you will be asked to associate that to your submission during the online submission process. We also strongly encourage all co-authors to link their ORCID ID to their accounts in our online peer review platforms. It takes seconds to do: click the link when prompted, sign into your ORCID account and our systems are automatically updated. Your ORCID iD will become part of your accepted publication’s metadata, making your work attributable to you and only you. Your ORCID iD is published with your article so that fellow researchers reading your work can link to your ORCID profile and from there link to your other publications.

    If you do not already have an ORCID iD please follow this link to create one or visit our ORCID homepage to learn more.

     

    Institutional subscriptions are available as part of the Psychological Science Package. Click here for more information.

    Individual subscriptions are available by becoming a member of the Association for Psychological Science. Click here for information on becoming a member of the APS.

    Institutional, Single Print Issue